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Towards a Well-being Model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Living with Chronic Disease

The cost of providing health care to people with chronic diseases continues to rise. Current chronic disease care implemented in primary health care settings focuses on efficient use of resources, safety and quality of health services, teams of providers and well informed and involved patients. The role of culture and family in maintaining a person’s well-being are rarely considered. Findings from the Kanyini Qualitative Study, however, have raised important questions about what care means, and how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples experience life-long illness.

A study is underway to develop the framework for a “Well-being Model” which aims to improve quality of care, health outcomes and importantly the quality of life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with a chronic disease.

Wellbeing Model FrameworkImportantly, a National Reference Group has already been formed to
guide the development of this Well-being Model framework.

The study comprises three stages:

Stage 1
  • Establish the National Reference Group
  • Review literature pertaining to current methods of managing chronic disease
  • Explore definitions of well-being for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Review findings from existing and previous Kanyini Vascular Collaboration projects
Stage 2
  • Collect, interpret and summarise findings from Stage 1
  • Work with the National Reference Group to build agreement on the key elements to be included in the framework
Stage 3
  • Develop the draft framework
  • Seek feedback from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and primary healthcare providers
  • Work with the National Reference Group to build agreement on the final framework which will become the foundation for a Well-being Model for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples living with chronic disease.

Moving Forward

Towards the end of this study, agreement on the development of specific resources for pilot implementation into sites will be sought. Once again, contributions in terms of advice from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and primary health care providers will guide this further work.

More information

Dr Carol Davy
Research Fellow, Wardliparingga Aboriginal Research Unit, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute
Email: carol.davy@sahmri.com
Phone: 881 284 220